Teaser Tuesday #7

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of A Daily Rhythm.

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS!
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Furthermore

My Teasers:

When their world was built it was so breathtakingly beautiful-so rich and colorful- the sky wept for a hundred years. Tears of great joy and grief flooded the earth, fissuring it apart and, in the process, creating rivers and lakes and oceans that still exist today. (Page 100)

Furthermore – By Tahereh Mafi

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The Diabolic – By S.J. Kincaid

The DiabolicRating:

Buy Links:

Hardcover          Kindle        Paperback

Synopsis2A Diabolic is ruthless. A Diabolic is powerful. A Diabolic has a single task: Kill in order to protect the person you’ve been created for.

Nemesis is a Diabolic, a humanoid teenager created to protect a galactic senator’s daughter, Sidonia. The two have grown up side by side, but are in no way sisters. Nemesis is expected to give her life for Sidonia, and she would do so gladly. She would also take as many lives as necessary to keep Sidonia safe.

When the power-mad Emperor learns Sidonia’s father is participating in a rebellion, he summons Sidonia to the Galactic court. She is to serve as a hostage. Now, there is only one way for Nemesis to protect Sidonia. She must become her. Nemesis travels to the court disguised as Sidonia—a killing machine masquerading in a world of corrupt politicians and two-faced senators’ children. It’s a nest of vipers with threats on every side, but Nemesis must keep her true abilities a secret or risk everything.

As the Empire begins to fracture and rebellion looms closer, Nemesis learns there is something more to her than just deadly force. She finds a humanity truer than what she encounters from most humans. Amidst all the danger, action, and intrigue, her humanity just might be the thing that saves her life—and the empire.

My reviewSet against an intergalactic background, this dystopian fantasy was just pure adrenaline rush!!! To be honest, I haven’t read too many fantasies set in space, so I don’t know how this novel measures up to some of the others in its genre, but just speaking as someone who was a bit bored with dystopian fiction, this was just what I needed to get back into the genre again. It had all the elements one would be familiar with, right from political coups, murderous monarchies, forbidden love, a whole lot of “post-apocalyptic” mess and a ruling elite family that thrives on renouncing past history to hold onto power. But there was something so fresh and fluid about the storytelling, that all the sheen of exciting descriptions – of the world, the humanoids, the spaceships, technology – doesn’t take your attention away from what forms the crux of the book – Just how transcendental are the lines between love, loyalty and servitude? In the beginning, I was a bit worried that Nemesis will get boring as the book progresses, for being (literally!) robotic. But, I just fell in love with how the author, S.J. Kincaid, managed to strike the balance between her being an “invention” to her actually having the capacity to develop humane feelings. It never felt ridiculous because Kincaid sets up the details and groundwork pretty well. The Diabolic’s entire “construction” is based on loyalty to one person.

Nemesis and Sidonia’s relationship was beautiful and as Sidonia keeps trying to convince Nemesis, just because she was “designed” to feel loyal to her, it doesn’t mean that “forced” love isn’t real. This is something Nemesis struggles with throughout the book, whether she can really submit herself to another person’s cause and beliefs, especially after circumstances end up bringing her and Tyrus Domitrian (the corrupt Emperor’s nephew) together as they team up and try to bring down the Domitrian clan. I was surprised that the love story didn’t bother me at all in this book though it did take up a significant part of the story. Maybe because it was written in a way that wasn’t distracting and actually felt very integral to the objectives of the main story – whether it is revenge, political power-play or just survival. It just felt natural that there had to be a Nemesis and Tyrus partnership.

I absolutely loved the female characters in this book, not just Nemesis and Sidonia but a whole lot of others. In fact, it is probably the women more than the men who not just wielded actual power, but also knew how to manipulate and use it for their version of the “greater good”.  I also liked how clear the class demarcations were vis-à-vis the planet and space dwellers. I was just so happy and .. impressed with how neat everything was – the world-building , history, tech-stuff, sci-fi, politics and power-hungry families. Was it perfect? Well, maybe not. But it was as neat as one can expect from a standalone fantasy. I was satisfied with – this is a bit of a shocker – not just the love story but also the love triangle (yup, there is one, a very unusual one).

I was a bit taken aback with the sort-of-happy ending which came after some very twisted maneuvers and shocking revelations. I would have probably preferred a darker ending which would have fit in perfectly with the rest of the book. Nevertheless, it was a really good way to end the book. Kincaid finishes it off in a way which leaves you with a slight doubt about what exactly happened and who is telling the truth. That just about sums up what a lot of the book was about – finding a way to keep your love alive amidst a whole lot of backstabbing.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, Jack Thorne

  Rating:

Synopsis:

Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage. The play will receive its world premiere in London’s West End on July 30, 2016.

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.

Review: 

After reading all the reviews, and after all that I came to know about the book, I wasn’t really planning on buying it. But, my husband surprised me by taking me to B&N under the pretext of  “let’s just roam around a bit and spend the evening browsing books”  and buying it for me. I was all “Oh, umm… I heard it isn’t really that good, and well you know.. it isn’t exactly Harry’s story.. for me, the story ended after seven books…. “  and so on.. . Then, I kept staring at the huge stack of the Cursed Child copies… and I said “Oh screw it, let’s buy it!”

Since I never planned on reading it so soon – I had just booked it at my library and would have had to wait for months to read it as there were more than a hundred holds for it – I carelessly browsed through quite a few major spoilers online. I didn’t mind it either because the whole idea of Cursed Child felt weird to me so  I was pretty okay with reading some of the big spoilers. But now that I actually ended up reading it, I am in a bit of a conundrum about how to review it.  As I cannot really exclaim that “I was surprised by this” for some of the things that I knew beforehand.

So you must be wondering whether I even managed to like or enjoy the book?

Well, hell yeaahhh!!!

*Note : This review contains mild spoilers, with me gushing and maybe using the word “nostalgia” and it’s variants a dozen times*

The story pretty much hinges on time-travelling being done by more than one character multiple times. The whole thing was unconvincing and that wasn’t the only one. Time Turners and Polyjuice Potions were spoken about, summoned and used so casually, you would find it hard to believe that there was a time when these two concepts were stressed about, discussed and explained with such detail in past books. So yes, the writers take a lot of “magical liberties” with time, space and appearances. You have Transfiguration being used as a temporary substitute for Polyjuice Potion in one scene, and Time Turners creating alternate realities in so many others (and I know all about that, okay??  Wrote an entire review on it, so don’t tell me – time-travel<>alternate reality, what’s the difference?)

But damn, I wasn’t prepared for all the nostalgia that is going to follow with being re-introduced to so many characters (some dead in real-time) in the other timelines. All that going back and forth time sprung up those lump-in-my-throat moments which probably wasn’t possible by just following the lives of older characters in real time.  And speaking of the older characters, oh geez, it was so weird to see this side of Draco; and weirder to see him and Harry having polite conversations. Well, it was all-round surreal to see everyone older, introspective and making candid admissions like both Ginny and Draco confessing that they were jealous of the Harry-Hermione-Ron friendship at Hogwarts!! To see Ron being this goofy dad and uncle cracking lame jokes. Ron still being the first one to get affected by Draco’s snark, take the bait and get up to punch him. Despite the seriousness of that scene, I had a huge smile on my face and thinking “Some things never change….”

What about the younger ones, you ask? Well, the Cursed Child focuses mostly on Albus and Scorpius as they travel through time more than once. Scorpius was too kind and well, positively angelic right from the first scene, Albus already seemed to be over-burdened with being Harry’s son and named after Dumbledore and Snape. He has a less-than-pleasant time at Hogwarts, but from whatever I gauged, Hogwarts might have made it worse but it felt like he had already made up his mind that school is going to be terrible. And Scorpius seemed to be speaking for us readers, always trying to be positive and making the best of things and chiding Albus for always whining about his life. I guess what I am saying is that, both the characters felt a bit contrived. As if Albus was written to always sulk and Scorpius was written to always be nicer, sensible and pleasing to read about. Then again, just the idea that it is Albus and Scorpius – a Potter and a Malfoy becoming best friends – is what made their scenes interesting to me.

If I really think about it, the shared history is what made everything interesting. I mean, who would have thought that two decades later Harry and Draco will be having a conversation about how they don’t understand their sons? Or that, Ron will exclaim about how similarly geeky Hermione and Draco’s son are? These small moments – and not the big, but frankly; bordering-on-the-ridiculous Time Turner plot – that makes this book worth reading and cherishing – Reading about both Hermione struggling to balance work and home, Harry getting dreams about his childhood with the Dursleys, Ron finally learning how to be expressive about his feelings towards Hermione and Draco struggling with the process of grieving.

I devoured the book in a few hours (well, obviously!) and as the book neared its last few pages with a very familiar scene from the past, I wished it was a few pages longer. A few more scenes with the trio+Ginny+Draco as parents, as colleagues, as friends, as former Hogwarts students…. Sigh, how much I’ve missed reading about these fictional characters 😦

[ARC Review] The Infinity of You & Me – By J.Q. Coyle

Rating:

Hardcover:  256 pages
Expected publication: November 8th 2016
Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin
Note: I won an ARC of this book via Goodreads giveaways. Would like to thank the publishers!!
Buy Links:

Kindle      Hardcover

Synopsis

What if every life-altering choice you made could split your world into infinite worlds?

Almost fifteen, Alicia is smart and funny with a deep connection to the poet Sylvia Plath, but she’s ultimately failing at life. With a laundry list of diagnoses, she hallucinates different worlds—strange, decaying, otherworldly yet undeniably real worlds that are completely unlike her own with her single mom and one true friend. In one particularly vivid hallucination, Alicia is drawn to a boy her own age named Jax who’s trapped in a dying universe. Days later, her long-lost father shows up at her birthday party, telling her that the hallucinations aren’t hallucinations, but real worlds; she and Jax are bound by a strange past and intertwining present. This leads her on a journey to find out who she is while trying to save the people and worlds she loves. J.Q. Coyle’s The Infinity of You & Me is a wild ride through unruly hearts and vivid worlds guaranteed to captivate.

My thoughts

I think I must be going through a blogger’s block because I am really struggling to come up with complete reviews these days. So I thought I will do something different this time:

multiverse Alicia finds out that the world contains NOT a universe but a multiverse and that all her nightmares are actually real lives and scenarios playing out. It took some time for me to realize a basic fact – what makes her special is not that she has different selves, but that she has the ability to consciously flit between the bodies of all her selves. She has the “awareness” that there are more lives of hers out there. The term for such people is – Spandrel (this is an actual word in English, btw). This was interesting and in some ways reminded me of another genre – time-travel. Now, time-travel is something that I have slowly gotten familiar with, atleast familiar with some “rules” that a lot of authors employ. For example, your past and present selves can’t meet without bad consequences.  But with multiverse being new to me, and with this book being a standalone (?), I felt that there was probably too much of complications packed in. This is not exactly a criticism. Considering it is a standalone, I felt the authors did a really good job staging everything. But there were a few things which could have made better sense if brought up by Alicia. Like for example, why didn’t she ever question anyone what will happen if people’s two selves meet? For most of the book I thought maybe that is not even possible because, from what I had understood this is not like time-travel but alternate realities. So, I thought maybe two selves meeting each other isn’t a possibility. But, something like that actually happens with a character in the end. But Alicia isn’t freaked out or wondering at all. I was surprised she wasn’t curious what would happen in such a case. I felt that is such a big thing to be sprung out at us in the end without any explanation as to how that works. Apart from these issues, I found it quite entertaining and fun to read. And may I say, despite all the problematic logic, I understood this better (whatever was put on paper) than a time-travel fiction I read earlier this year.

diversity.jpgAlicia’s best friend is Hafeez, an American-born of Pakistani descent. I rarely come across best friends of South Asian ethnicity in the books I read. Since the focus isn’t really on Hafeez or his family in this book, we don’t get to know much from his POV. But still, I liked how his family’s background and what he might have gone through all his life was subtly incorporated.

parenting.jpgAlicia has been diagnosed with everything you can think of when one says “mental health” – from ADD and anxiety to hallucinations and paranoia. She struggles to make daily decisions and it is so severe that the thought of choosing from the cafeteria menu can trigger a panic attack. So, I found it ironical that the one decision that Alicia is sure of – accept what she can do and be in a multiverse – is not met with encouragement but resistance by her mother.  However, truth be told, I could see where her mother was coming from. It is a pretty perplexing way to live. Moreover, I could understand why she didn’t want to lose a “single” Alicia to someone with knowledge of her different selves.

eternityIn the book, we see a character that set off a chain of unfortunate events with the intention of doing the right thing. But, I found it interesting that the “selflessness” was borne out of the knowledge that the person can have or branch into many selves and a “sacrifice” in one branch of life is palatable when you can live a “happily-ever-after” version in another branch.  But, the character is never really able to create or live a proper and fulfilling “family life” because the other participant is tired of inhabiting different realities and abandons the idea. So the character creates a partial reality that plays out the desired phase of life. It was honestly kind of sad to read about because the whole scene was set up like a doomed end to an incomplete love story.

final.jpgThis wasn’t perfect and there were couple of other things that I felt could have been dealt with better:

  • Addressing mental health – I would have liked it if a clear distinction was made between the symptoms manifesting as a result of what Alicia was actually suffering from all her “universal” life and the symptoms which were a result of her turning into a spandrel. The way it was explained, it looked like everything was because she was turning into a spandrel and that she never really had any mental health disorders in the first place.
  • Love Interests – There are teens developing crushes and falling in love, but that made no difference or impact on the story whatsoever. Alicia is attracted to the boy – Jax – from her “dream” from the first time she sets her eyes on him and well, it is clear that this is the “REAL” love story (and not Alicia-Hafeez, because, well, of course Hafeez being the best friend will be friend-zoned). But it didn’t make any impression on me whatsoever. I didn’t care whether they would get their happily-ever-after or not.

But.. but… but… despite all crinkles, I really enjoyed the book. It was wildly entertaining and imaginative.  I had so much to think about and say once I finished reading, so I couldn’t wait to start typing and get out of my reviewing block!

[Book Spotlight] The Urban Boys : Discovery of the Five Senses (Volume 1)

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Author: K.N. Smith
Genre: Action Adventure/ Paranormal
Publisher: Two Petals Publishing
Release Date: September, 2015

Synopsis:

The Urban Boys: Discovery of the Five Senses is an action-adventure story about five teen boys who are mysteriously exposed to a foreign energy source that gives them extremely heightened senses. Sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell become hypersensitive gifts that forever change the world!

The story chronicles their effortless interrelations and later exposes the testing of their deep bonds, and introduces the reader to an array of supporting characters who alter the boys’ lives forever. The Urban Boys offers young and mature readers central themes of loyalty, responsibility, honesty, fear, and triumph, which become artfully integrated with cinematic-level action and high drama.

We wonder, will they pass the test of fate, and will each of us pass the test of our very own lives? Intriguing, intelligent, and full of action, The Urban Boys offers a memorable, emotion-packed, thrilling ride for traditional and digital readers of all ages! (first in a series)

About the Author:

K.N. Smith K.N. Smith is an American author and passionate advocate of childhood and family literacy programs throughout the world. She continues to inspire students of all ages to reach their highest potential in their literary and educational pursuits. Her creative, lyrical flair sweeps across pages that twist, turn, and grind through elements of paranormal and action-adventure in diverse, exciting, edge-of-your-seat narratives. She lives with her family in California.

Book Trailer:

Buy Links:

Kindle
Paperback

Connect with the Author:

 Website  Twitter   Facebook

To follow rest of the tour, click here.

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Gambit (The Prodigy Chronicles #1)

9781942111061 Rating:

Author : C.L. Denault
Published by : REUTS Publications
Publication date : March 31st 2015
Genres : Dystopia, Young Adult

Note : I received an e-copy of this book from xpressobooktours in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis (From Goodreads):

In Earth’s battle-ridden future, humans have evolved. Those with extraordinary skills rise to power and fame. Those without live in poverty.

Sixteen-year-old Willow Kent believed she was normal. But when a genetically-advanced military officer shows up in her village and questions her identity, long-buried secrets begin to emerge. With remarkable skills and a shocking genetic code the Core and its enemies will do anything to obtain, Willow suddenly finds the freedom she craves slipping through her fingers. Greed, corruption, and genetic tampering threaten every aspect of her existence as she’s thrust, unwilling, into the sophisticated culture of the elite Core city. To ensure peace, she must leave the past behind, marry a man she’s never met, and submit to the authority of a relentless officer with a hidden agenda of his own.

Her life has become a dangerous game. How much will she sacrifice in order to win?

My Review:

The book has a lot of elements you would expect and be familiar with from a classically modern-day dystopian novel. But the first few pages gave me a queasy sense of deja vu with its all-too-familiar introduction of a girl in her teens living with the simpler folks from the outer villages who are governed and at the mercy of scraps from the oppressive main city. However, the story took off amazingly well and set itself apart due to the author’s deft handling of all the revelations about Willow’s identity and the murky politics of the Core city. We are never given all the information completely and yet enough to keep us inquisitive and interested. I quite liked reading Willow’s peaceful, normal life with her siblings and parents in their family-owned pub and her friendship-with-romantic-potential relationship with Tem. And then there is the school in a slightly decrepit building that she attends where she also gets a bit of defence training from her instructor Kane. The stable life that she knows turns on its head when Reece, an officer from the Core pays a visit to their pub. She is forced to leave everything that she has grown up with and move into an uncertain future.

The world-building is pretty cool, I totally dug the idea of the Core city run by powerful councils and families who own the major power and medical industries. Some of the futuristic initiatives by the Core such as an almost-complete reliance on solar energy and tree conservation (by entirely doing away with paper) gave me a vibe of a utopian-tomorrow for a fleeting moment. I loved the whole concept of the Surge, which takes place when kids turn sixteen and may or may not result in them developing a “skill” (translation: superpower). The first half of the book is pure adrenaline rush, very entertaining and everything that a first book of a dystopian-fantasy series should be like. I loved the power-play between Reece and Willow. I liked how Willow was written; she was angry, conflicted, rebellious, and almost felt cheated that she has no control over the rest of her life. I thought the way she reacted was raw, natural and just the way I would expect a sixteen year old to react when told that she has to leave behind her family and country ways and take on another identity.

So what didn’t I like? Well, pretty much most of the second-half of the book. It turns Willow-Reece centric and let’s just say, it is something I couldn’t wrap my head around. Why? Well, the author does too good of a job establishing Reece as a cold-blooded, abusive, murderous and manipulative guy, so it is difficult to see past that later on in the book. I honestly found him nothing less than loathsome. Is he a layered, interesting character? Yes, definitely. And that’s what made all the Reece-Willow (and Reece-X/Y/Z) confrontations so chillingly effective in the first half of the book. But their equation starts changing after the story shifts to the Core city and that’s when I felt both the pace and narrative of the book drops. We meet new characters, but they are just not allowed more breathing room. Some of them are in a position of power and actually seem nice and capable of empathy, so I couldn’t understand how they seemed undisturbed by some of the violent goings-on. There are a lot of “Willow settling in and getting used to her new surrounding” pages, and while it is nice and also a bit amusing to see her staring and questioning about all the new gadgets and stuff, it gets a bit boring after sometime. I started missing some of the characters from earlier part of the book. And as I said, there was way too much of Reece-Willow, and to be honest, it turned into more of a Dystopian-Romance. The romance bit troubled me, because Reece does too many things in the beginning of the book which is hard to forgive and brush over, so the attempt to humanize him in the second half of the book and Willow softening towards him didn’t sit well with me. Nor did his blow-hot-blow-cold, physically and emotionally aggressive behaviour towards Willow.

At over 550 pages in paperback, it is a long book but there is enough meat in the first half to go through the entire book easily. Gambit ends on a promising note, with the significance behind the title revealed and Willow trying to ascertain herself in the position of being able to make more choices. It is clear that there is a lot more to the series in terms of Core politics and Willow’s destiny. I always find it a bit irksome when the romance ends up taking away the focus from other (and, in my opinion, stronger) aspects of the story. But keeping that aside, it is a pretty decent series-opener.

Buy links:
Gambit : Paperback
Gambit : Kindle

The Ugly Stepsister (Unfinished Fairy Tales #1) by Aya Ling

Rating:

Kat is seventeen and raised by a single, working mom. Her typical day comprises of going to school, writing for the school newspaper, focussing on landing college scholarships and taking care of her kid sister in the evenings. She is a bit of a klutz, both in the “tripping over my own feet” way and “tripping over my tongue while talking to hot guys” way. She is also a huge book nerd.

The thing with people who discover their book nerd-iness very early on is that they buy dozens of books pretty much soon after they have figured out how to read. Then they move onto books for “grownups” but the first book haul remains in attics or the highest bookshelves and collects dust till one day your mom calls you and tells you that the books must LEAVE because there are too many and all it does is eats up space. That’s pretty much what happens to Kat when her mom asks her to haul the books downstairs so that they can give it to the yard sale.

So when she sits down and goes through her books, she comes across an old battered copy of Cinderella. When she accidentally drops it, the pages fall apart. As she gets up and climbs down the stairs, she trips and becomes unconscious. When she gets up, she finds herself in strange, but familiar surroundings. She can’t quite point out what is familiar, till a levitating, ghost-like goblin Krev appears and informs her that the Cinderella copy was actually created by his goblin king, and as a punishment for the book falling apart, the king has cursed her to inhabit the Cinderella tale as one of the stepsisters. Her only chance of escaping the Story World is finishing the story, by finding Cinderella, and getting her married to the Prince with the wedding bells ringing in the background. But how? Where is the fairy godmother to transform a pumpkin into a coach and mice into coachmen? How is she going to stop her insufferable but gorgeous Story sister from courting the Prince? And most importantly, how is she going to make the Prince and Cinderella fall in love with each other?

The best thing about connecting with bloggers is having book recommendations fill your reader or twitter timeline. I saw this book mentioned quite a few times but the review that really got me interested was the one in Cheryl’s blog here. I had vaguely heard about fairy retellings but to be honest I seriously had no idea it was a genre by itself. I am quite glad I picked up this book as my first fairy retelling read. It was fun, quite creative, and magical without relying too much on literal magic. Kat had this feisty, stubborn streak which I think everyone do have to some extent. Just that it stays latent until you are pushed to a corner and then have no option but to be gutsy and not think of consequences. And that is what happens with Kat. If she wants to see her real mom and sister again, she has to adapt to the world she has accidentally entered into.

Nothing goes right for Kat in the Story World. As the Story progresses, she finds it hard to make things happen as she remembers from the book she has read. She slowly starts noticing the “not so fairytale-like” aspects of the world, such as kids as young as five years old working 14 hour shifts in factories and girls expected to attract wealthy men in soirees and parties before they turn twenty-one. For a book-within-a-book that is supposed to be a well-known magical fairytale, there is actually very little “magic” as such. (And well, Cinderella wasn’t really about sorcerers waving wands throughout the tale, so…). The tale is more reminiscent of historical fiction – a world where there are estates owned by Earls, and Princes throwing ballroom parties to announce their brides. I enjoyed reading about and grew fond of everyone, even if half of them are your generic clichés such as rich, spoilt girls who are look like born supermodels, handsome wealthy aristocrats, callous employers and good-hearted poor maids. In a weird way, it kind of just fit, and didn’t seem like something negative. Maybe it is because it is supposed to be a Story World of a very well-known children’s tale.  And plus, I liked that the author sort of even acknowledged that she is using well-known tropes through quotes like this:

“Honestly, we’ve met coincidentally so many times that it feels like I’m in a badly written novel. Oh, wait, I actually am”

There are more such quotes sprinkled throughout the book which made even some done-to-death scenarios interesting to read. And all the book and movie references that Kat makes in her head (probably to keep herself from going insane), Harry Potter, LoTR, Narnia, Inception .. did make me smile. Harry Potter was a bit overdone though. The book has everything in phases, a lot of carefree moments, tinge of sadness, couples falling in love, couples with unfinished love stories, divide between rich and poor, some good men and women, and some others who are never going to change.  I also liked how “living through” the story made Kat more self-assured and confident about certain things.

There were a few things that I felt could have been presented better. I just thought that the magic bit was too conveniently and suddenly introduced to make things fall in place for Kat in the end. It would have been easier to “believe” it if the magic was actually established and dwelled upon with more details. I guess what I mean to say is, that bit was never really fleshed out well. In fact, the main reason for Kat “falling into” this world itself was sort of flimsy – dropping an old book. Another thing that I found hard to fathom is when Kat, owing to certain circumstances, has to reveal her secret to some people as the Story progresses. And the characters easily believe that they are not “real” but a part of a book. A more normal reaction would have been to think Kat is off her rocker. And it is funny how you view something differently if you are in someone else’s shoes. I mean, for the Story world people, their world is the “real” one and Kat feels otherworldly.

I hope this long review didn’t end up being too spoiler-y. If you want to try a fairy retelling, this is a really good book to start with. It is light-hearted without being frivolous and has a sprightly protagonist to root for.

Buy links:

The Ugly Stepsister – Kindle
The Ugly Stepsister – Paperback